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Becoming ©2013-16 (ongoing)
An experimental film documenting a child's haircuts from toddler through youth, Becoming is a meditation on the concept of power—the power of the child as an individual, both in balance and in collision, with parental power.

To Have and To Hold ©2012
To Have and To Hold is an animation of a bed slowly spinning to a music box waltz as it unmakes itself down to bare bedposts. One by one, discarded possessions begin to rain down onto the bed, building into a precarious mound.

Audrey Superhero ©2010
Audrey Superhero, an experimental documentary, explores the shifting terrain of gender identity. The film includes vividly charged discussions with Audrey, who insists she is Superman.
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Held ©2010
A gigantic baby, eight feet in height, looks serenely out at the viewer. The baby, a painted rendition of the Gerber baby, seems vaguely familiar.
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Milky-Milk ©2010
A tiny LCD video monitor showing a life-sized breast viewed from below is suspended just above head-height. Perilously clinging to the nipple is a single droplet of milk, which in a matter of minutes falls from the nipple and obscures the view of the breast.

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From the Same Water ©2009
From the Same Water combines the sculptural element of a miniature pool with video projection. Projected inside the miniature pool is a human figure floating and sinking.


Water Windows ©2007-2008
This video installation of an underwater environment, framed within Peterborough Historical Society’s arched windows, investigates our personal relationships attached to everyday objects. Visions set loose under the current -- a chair, a swing set, a dress -- appear in slow motion, drifting in and out of view.

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The Audrey Samsara ©2005
The Audrey Samsara is a meditative, slowly unfolding video featuring the artist’s 18-month old daughter breastfeeding, falling asleep, reawakening, breastfeeding and again falling into deep sleep.

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Flow ©2005
Flow was filmed monthly during my recent pregnancy. This nine-minute piece (one minute per month) combines the sculpture of a miniature bathtub with video projection.
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Give (Work-in-progress) ©2005
Shown on a large LCD panel placed on the floor, Give addresses the complexities of self-protection, nurturing, and sexuality. The view presented is a recumbent woman seen from above, who slowly and sensually removes from her mouth what appears to be her entrails, and lays them upon her belly.
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Nightfeedings ©2005
The installation Nightfeedings features a miniature glass bed, precariously suspended as if free-floating. Seamlessly projected onto the glass bed’s surface is a video of an infant awakening at night, and then comforted and nursed back to sleep by her mother.
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Tug ©2005
Tug is a three-channel video installation representing the interplay of tension and harmony within parenthood. A man and a woman struggle at tug-of-war in a life-sized, diptych projection, while on a separate, wall-mounted monitor a toddler dances, sings, implores mama and dada and shuttles between them.
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Shitfit ©2003
Shitfit combines a sculptural element with video. In Shitfit, a wall-mounted, miniature door containing a small lens reveals a video of a child’s bedroom interior, giving the impression of peering into a room behind the door.
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Without © 2001
Without is a video installation in which a 5 by 6.6 foot projection is cast upon the ceiling of an intimate, darkened room. The video projector is hidden beneath a false floor, and there are floor mats and pillows for two viewers.
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Her Majesty’s Request ©2000
Her Majesty’s Request combines a sculptural element with video. From afar, Her Majesty’s Request appears to be a child-sized Chippendale-style chair with a plush, red velvet cushion. Drawing nearer, the viewer may begin to hear quiet kissing and slurping sounds which beckon for closer inspection.
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Shelter for Daydreaming ©2000
Shelter for Daydreaming is a two-channel video which invokes the netherworld of “In-Betweeness.” Projected large-scale onto a free standing, “floating” wall centered within the gallery, the first channel of video shows a small house seemingly suspended in an aqueous region which is without gravity, yet is somehow tethered to the movement of the underside of waves.
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Almost Home ©1998
A video installation with three channels of video and audio. Based upon the memories and dreams we associate with our past, present and future homes, Almost Home is a triptych of large-scale projections showing miniature, handmade houses.

Pitch and Roll ©1998
Pages from the artist’s teenage journal scroll slowly across two small LCD monitors which rotate back to back on a stand in the center of the room, revealing her thirteen-year-old quips and quandaries. She “frenches” a boy for the first time and bemoans the fact that the same week her father gave away her backyard swingset.

Ebb ©1996
The projected image of blood-clouded water fills a miniature tub into which a woman climbs, crossing the static bounds of space and object. Slowly, one begins to notice the blood recede into her body, the water clearing.

Trapped Wasp ©1998
Home is portrayed as a place for potential entrapment. On the wall in a small, darkened room hangs an 11 x 14 inch gold-leaf oval frame. Rear-projected within the frame is a portrait of a bride, with a larger-than-life sized wasp seemingly trapped within the frame.

How to Pee Like A Boy ©1996
We illicitly land in the Men’s room, in front of an unenclosed toilet bowl. The projection fills the miniature bowl hung on the wall and spills onto the floor below.

Please ©1996:
The image of a man and woman is projected onto a miniature wrought-iron bed. The female character achingly expresses her desire for her mate, but is met with rejection. Their fulfillment is incomplete, and our desire is likewise thwarted.

Pocket ©1996
A mouth is projected onto a smaller-than-life-sized man’s button-down shirt. The girl slides her finger in and out of the boy’s mouth in exploration and in penetration.

House I ©1995
A tiny video monitor is contained within a paper house. The video shows a slow-motion tour through the narrator’s childhood home, while she recounts stories of her childhood auto-sexual experiments room by room

 
Don’t Fall in Love with Buildings ©2012
Don’t Fall in Love with Buildings was filmed with a surveillance camera in time-lapse during the last five weeks of the eviction from our Williamsburg, Brooklyn loft, our home for over fifteen years. Raw and unadorned, the physical and emotional process of leaving one’s long-term home is poignantly revealed.
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Audrey Superhero ©2010
Audrey Superhero, an experimental documentary, explores the shifting terrain of gender identity. The film includes vividly charged discussions with Audrey, who insists she is Superman.
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Sea of Remembering ©2009
Sea of Remembering is a voyage into an aqueous repository of domestic objects such as clothing, furniture and toys. Memory-based reflections of home, family and childhood carry us into the depths of reverie.

Variations on Contrary Motion (Canon at the Fifth) ©2006-2009
Suburban life in a nutshell—marriage, house, baby, meals, the child growing up and life gone awry… all told in a surreal story of metamorphosis where the miniature and the gigantic collide. Engagingly set to Bach’s Goldberg Variations, (played by Glenn Gould.)

99.9% Sure ©2000
99.9% Sure enters the uneasy yet intoxicating world of new-found love. The short vignette of anticipation and intimacy unfolds through gestures showing only the hands and mouths of the two characters.

Traces ©2000
Traces is an enigmatic, meditative consideration of the physical displacement that arrives when a romantic relationship is severed.

Closures © 1996
Closures moves in and out of a world simultaneously lilliputian and giant. Toy houses and real houses merge. Undersized objects and oversized humans collide.

 
 
Instructions on Parting (Work-in-progress) ©2016
Currently in post-production, Instructions on Parting is a feature-length documentary film that intertwines nature and humankind in the cyclical course of death and birth.

Firefly Elegy (Work-in-progress) ©2016
Taking the lovely but short-lived firefly as a metaphor, Firefly Elegy, a multi-channel video installation, focuses on my brother, who died of an intestinal sarcoma. Throughout the years of his illness I chose to film details of his body—his head, his surgery scars, his hands, his shoulders—as touched by my hands. These images will flicker from many tiny monitors, hung at various heights from the ceiling of a darkened gallery. Like watching fireflies at night, I intend the power of the installation to rest as much in what is briefly seen as in periods of darkness while waiting for the next glimmer of light.